Little Guy as a kitten with his Splint and Resting in the Bird Bath

 

 

On April 20, 2010 I was taking my cat Little Guy to see Dr. Vickie Brandon, my vet at Felines and Friends in Ada, OK for his booster shot.  In the clinic there is a sign that says dogs should be on a leash.  There were 2 small dogs milling around in the lobby area that were not on a leash.  One ran over to the door as I approached.  The owner saw him and made no move to restrain him.  In order to keep the dog from exiting the building, I put my cat carrier down low and tried to open the door while preventing him from going out. 

 

The next thing I knew the door hit the carrier which was held together with snap type closures, and it completely fell apart.  It was lying in the partially open doorway.  I kept working to keep Little Guy from going outside.  I was determined to not let him get out of the building.  It was a frantic scene.  Finally, he ran into the lobby and jumped up on the counter while hissing at the dogs.  I didn't care what he was doing at that point, just that he was in the building.  I pulled the collapsed carrier into the lobby and went and grabbed Little Guy. 

 

Everyone in the lobby--the other client, the vet tech, and Dr. Brandon were all just about in shock from the event.  We all thought Little Guy would run out the door and never be seen again or hit by a car on the adjacent highway.  I am sure we were all puzzled as to what kept Little Guy from escaping the open door. 

 

 

Vickie Brandon, DVM

2627 Arlington St.

Ada, OK  74820

580-436-6369 (MEOW)

 

I pondered this as I got him set up in the exam room.  I told Dr. Brandon and her staff that  I had a strong feeling that a Guardian Angel must have stood in front of the door and kept Little Guy from going out, because something or someone stopped him from running out the open door.  Whatever it was, I thank God for it. 

 

Little Guy is a very special cat.  As a kitten a few year's ago, he showed up at my house limping.  The next day he came by still limping so I caught him and took him to my vet.  Much to everyone's surprise he had a broken front leg.  It was completely snapped in two.  He had to wear a splint for several weeks.  That was a challenging time.  Little Guy didn't like wearing the splint at all.  Nearly every day he removed the outside bandage and I had to have it rewrapped.

 

I have always thought that Little Guy was likely injured through some form of abuse by the neighbors across the alley at the time--either by the adults or children.  He could have been hit by a car, but he had no other injuries.  The neighbors let their cats breed at will and never got them fixed.  When they came in my yard and ate my food I got them neutered or spayed.  I knew the situation would soon spiral out of control if I didn't.

 

At the time Little Guy got his splint, he tested positive for Feline Leukemia.  That was very  disappointing.  But in a few weeks his body was able to clear the virus out of his system and he was free of it.  That was remarkable.  Finally, he got his splint off and by the next day was walking normally.  Since that time he has done very well.

 

Little Guy climbed up the tree trunk in the middle

and jumped over onto the roof and climbed up it a short distance

 
On December 27, 2016 I was standing on the back porch looking at the back yard when I saw Little Guy dash up the tree by the garage.  He was running very fast and I was wondering where he was going to end up.  I quickly approached the tree.  My husband Arnold was outside and he also went over to the tree.  We were both shocked and very worried about his location.  Unfortunately, he had jumped from a tree branch onto the side of the roof of the garage which sloped up sharply.  He was sliding some on the shingles and we were both really frightened for Little Guy. 

Arnold ran over and got a tall metal ladder and brought it around and set it by the tree and leaned it against the gutter on the garage roof.  He quickly climbed up the ladder and began trying to coax Little Guy down, but he was in a really dangerous, precarious situation.  We could imagine him sliding down off the roof and falling all the way to the ground.  My medical training told me that could have been fatal or he could have been very seriously injured.  The coaxing at first didnít work.  We briefly discussed whether we should try to call the Animal Warden to see if we could get him to help.  We kept that as an option if all else failed.  I was really praying that Little Guy would get down safely.

 
Next, Arnold got down and got a board. He hoped to help him get down by putting the board between the roof and a branch of the tree.  No luck.  Finally, after more time and coaxing Little Guy jumped off the roof back on a tree branch.  Arnold got him turned around while hoping he didnít jump back on the roof.  Finally, he began backing down the tree limb.  That was the safest way for him to go.  Thankfully, his claws were long and they helped keep him from falling.  After about a 20 minute ordeal Little Guy got all the way down on the ground.  We were all happy and relieved.  We just hope he doesnít try that adventure again.  It is possible that Little Guyís Guardian Angel helped him get down from his very dangerous perch on the roof.  At least we know that his best human friend helped him a lot.  We are really thankful Little Guy survived his dangerous ordeal.

 

 

Safety Warning

 

 

Regarding the incident with the snap type closures coming open on Little Guy's carrier in the first story, I would encourage all who have those type carriers to use an additional closure of some kind on them for safety.  My husband drilled 3 small holes in each side's horizontal edge and put nylon cable ties in ours that can be removed if necessary to fully open the carrier.  Also, always double check when you close any pet carrier door to be sure it is fully latched.  Those doors can come open too if not completely closed at the top and bottom.

 

Other Stories with Dr. Vickie Brandon

 

 

Little Guy April 2010

 

By Nancy Allen

 

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